Literary Criticism

Eliot and his influence

The relationships between the work of all three critics are complex. Only seven years separated them in age. Eliot and…

7 years ago

Methods and Institutions: Eliot, Richards and Leavis

My discussion of the work of Woolf, Murry and Orage in the previous chapter indicates that the personal authority of…

7 years ago

Murry and Orage: Editors and sages

If Woolf’s criticism was Paterian in its vision of the relationship between reader and text, then that of Murry, and…

7 years ago

The importance of difficulty

On one level, it is easy to see both Murry’s humanism and Woolf’s visions as a means of self-promotion, resting…

7 years ago

Woolf and Murry: Impressionism and authority

Woolf’s opposition to scholarship and the canon, and her upholding of a method of reading that was emphatically non-institutional, make…

7 years ago

The common reader: Leisure and idealism

Woolf’s attempt to validate a non-academic approach to literature is best exemplified by her championing of Samuel Johnson’s figure of…

7 years ago

Virginia Woolf: Criticism as private experience

It is difficult to approach Virginia Woolf without being conscious not only of her Modernism, but also of her relationship…

7 years ago

Criticism and the Modernists: Woolf, Murry, Orage

The resistance to literary scholarship, in the form of a set of critical philos- ophies that emphasised the relationship between…

7 years ago

The analysis of Shakespeare

The literary histories of Courthope, Gosse and Saintsbury, written in the closing years of the nineteenth century, exemplify two markedly…

7 years ago

Literary history: Scholarship and narrative

The personal forms of authority to which these professors clung stand at an ironic distance from the courses outlined in…

7 years ago